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5 Ways to Celebrate Stephen Hawking’s Life and Work

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5 Ways to Celebrate Stephen Hawking’s Life and Work

Exhibitions to honour the scientist's tireless inquisitiveness.

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The indefatigable visionary Stephen Hawking died this morning Wednesday, 14 March at his home in Cambridge. He was 76.

To acknowledge the work he did, the questions he asked and the depths of the universe that he travelled, these exhibitions at The Science Museum are well worth attending in his honour.

5 Ways to Celebrate Stephen Hawking’s Life and Work

Electronic tide modelling machine, invented and constructed by Shizuo Ishiguro at the National Institute of Science Museum Group Collection © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Electronic tide modelling machine, invented and constructed by Shizuo Ishiguro at the National Institute of Science Museum Group Collection © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Mathematics: The Winton Gallery

Housed in the bold, thought-provoking gallery designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, this exhibition examines how mathematics shapes our world and mathematicians occuply a fundamental role in society. From war and peace to life, death, money, trade and beauty, The Winton Gallery reveal how objects of mathematics connect to every aspect of our lives. Open daily at The Science Museum

Three field notebooks of botanical sketches and watercolours by William H Sykes. Natural History Museum

Three field notebooks of botanical sketches and watercolours by William H Sykes. Natural History Museum

Illuminating India

Illuminating India is a season of exhibitions and events that celebrates India’s contribution to science, technology and mathematics. The season includes two exhibitions: ‘5000 Years of Science and Innovation’ and ‘Photography 1857–2017’. Respectively they present a kaleidoscopic history of scientific breakthroughs in India and a unique photographic survey of the country’s technological and cultural development. Until 22 April, Free admission at The Science Museum

Colonies of bacteria created by bioartist Anna Dumitriu

Colonies of bacteria created by bioartist Anna Dumitriu

Superbugs: The Fight for Our Lives

Antibiotics have enabled us to combat diseases that were once untreatable, but bacteria have fought back. Meet superbugs, resistant bacteria to even the most powerful antibiotics. This exhibition examines the challenge of antibiotic resistance and presents global scientific research and personal stories of those waging war on superbugs. Until Spring 2019, Free admission at The Science Museum

Diagram of Skylark Mark II space rocket with annotations, c.1960s. Science Museum Group collection.

Diagram of Skylark Mark II space rocket with annotations, c.1960s. Science Museum Group collection.

Exploring Space

From rockets to satellites, probes to landers, this gallery is an introduction to the ins and outs of space – how astronauts breathe, eat, drink (and go to the toilet!). See a full-sized replica of Eagle—the lander that took astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin to the Moon in 1969. Rock up for the rockets. Two real space rockets are suspended from the ceiling—a British Black Arrow and a United States Scout. Open daily at The Science Museum.

Frankenstien

Frankenstein Festival

‘Cursed, cursed creator! Why did I live?’ —Frankenstein’s Creature. Easter brings this festival celebrating the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Immersive theatrical events, hands-on activities and experimental storytelling will explore the ethical, scientific and technical questions surrounding whether or not we should create ‘life’. 3 April – 8 April 2018 at The Science Museum.

Whilst the Cambridge Science Centre is currently moving, there are still plenty of  pop-up science events and activities to do around Hawking’s city. 

Science Museum Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2DD. Open daily: 10.00–18.00 (last entry 17.15). Friday 30 March – Sunday 15 April 2018: Open 10:00–18.30 (last entry 17.15).


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