zero waste

What is Zero Waste Week?

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Here's how we can move to a waste free future

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When we throw something away, it doesn’t truly go away. Sign up to Zero Waste Week to be part of the solution.

What is Zero Waste Week?

Zero Waste Week is an international campaign bringing people together to increase recycling, reduce landfill waste and participate in the circular economy. Taking place annually in the first week of September (6 – 10), the movement supplies educational resources for households, businesses, schools, and community groups.

The idea for the initiative emerged following the devastating effects of Boscastle flood in 2004, which washed away historic buildings, shops, and possessions. For Rachelle Strauss, it brought home the emergency of climate change, prompting her to launch the campaign, which has over 56 million participants worldwide.

The campaign’s mission is to highlight our individual and collective responsibility for the lifecycle of a product. By taking steps to reduce waste, we as consumers can generate greater demand for change.

zero waste

Anna Oliinyk

What Can You Do?

Sign up here to Zero Waste Week’s newsletter to receive handy hacks and environmental news. As well as donating to the campaign, their 30 day Waste Warriors online course promises you’ll be able to cut your household landfill waste by 80% and save £1,500.

For future-proofing food waste, check out the Good Club. It’s an online supermarket where customers can order produce like grains, nuts, and pasta to their door in reusable packaging. Simply empty into your own containers, and leave the packaging outside your door, which is collected the next day for free. goodclub.co.uk

Cut your waste down by downloading the My Little Plastic Footprint app. You’ll be able to track your plastic footprint, and with every item you add, you’ll discover sustainable alternatives. mylittleplasticfootprint.org

To start things off, read our guide to zero waste shops in London.

Main image: Getty

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Zero Waste Shops in London / The Zero Waste Movement