Anna Jones

Best Sustainable Cookbooks

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Planet-friendly recipes

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We all know what and how we eat directly impacts the environment – but with so many conflicting opinions, the world of eco-dining can be confusing. Should we be cutting out meat completely? What does organic actually mean? Which food packaging can be recycled? Luckily, we’re seeing more and more cookbooks addressing issues surrounding the planet. Read on for the sustainable cookbooks that deserve a place on your shelf.

Best Vegan Cookbooks / Sustainable Restaurants in London

Best Sustainable Cookbooks

 

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  • One Pot, One Pan, One Planet, Anna Jones

    One Pot, One Pan, One Planet by Anna Jones

    Chef and food writer Anna Jones is famed for her modern twists on plant-based dishes, which she first showcased in her award-winning cookbook A Modern Way to Eat. Her latest launch, One Pot, One Pan, One Planet, contains 200 low-maintenance recipes which use minimal equipment – each dish can be made using either one pot, pan or tray, hence the name. But it’s also filled with advice on sustainable cooking, with tips interspersed throughout the recipes alongside dedicated chapters on topics like plastic and packaging, eliminating food waste and saving energy. The dishes span a variety of cuisines, from hearty stews and curries to zingy noodle dishes and comforting pasta bakes, plus a handful of desserts. Harper Collins, £21.99

  • Eat Green, Melissa Hemsley

    Eat Green by Melissa Hemsley

    The Hemsley sisters were pioneers in the wellness movement of the past decade, known for popularising bone broth and spiralisers. But in recent years, they’ve become champions for eco-friendly, low-waste dining too. Melissa’s fourth book, Eat Green, is packed with recipes that benefit both our body and the planet. Seasonal vegetables take centre stage, though it’s not fully vegetarian, with many dishes giving the option of adding or removing meat or fish. Readers are also encouraged to substitute ingredients based on what needs using up in their cupboards, and Melissa offers suggestions for incorporating those half-finished bags of salad that often linger at the back of the fridge. Ebury, £18.15

  • 30 Easy Ways to Join the Food Revolution by Ollie Hunter

    30 Easy Ways to Join the Food Revolution by Ollie Hunter

    After appearing on MasterChef in 2013, Ollie Hunter took over Wiltshire pub The Wheatsheaf, which went on to win Business of the Year at the 2019 Sustainable Restaurant Association’s Food Made Good Awards. Then, in 2020, he shared his ideas on eating for the planet in a new book: 30 Ways to Join the Food Revolution. Designed to offer an approachable take on eco-friendly dining, the book is based on the simple principle that local ingredients equal the lowest carbon footprint. Recipes range from staple recipes like oat milk, gazpacho and soda bread to waste-reducing dishes including cauliflower leaf bhajis and asparagus ends soup. Pavilion Books, £11.16

  • Abel & Cole cookbook

    How to Eat Brilliantly Every Day: Abel & Cole

    Who knew that celeriac could be made into couscous? Or that leafy carrot tops can be used to make a tasty herb dressing? Abel & Cole’s colourful cookbook How to Eat Brilliantly Every Day offers a whole host of tips and tricks on seasonal eating, acquired over 30 years in the industry. Classic dishes are given fun twists: there’s asparagus and egg-fried quinoa, for instance, and broccoli walnut rarebit. It’s not all savoury either – watermelons are used to make mojito ice-lollies, while dates and cinnamons create spiced gingerbread truffles. There’s also a dedicated section on making your own broth, kraut and slaw, plus a handful of three-line recipes that help use up leftover ingredients. Ebury, £8.50

  • Eating for Pleasure, People and Planet by Tom Hunt

    Eating for Pleasure, People and Planet by Tom Hunt

    A root-to-fruit philosophy is pivotal to chef and food activist Tom Hunt. He earned his stripes working with Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall at River Cottage before going on to launch Bristol restaurant Poco Tapas Bar, which was awarded Sustainable Restaurant of the Year by the Sustainable Restaurant Association. Outlined in his second book, his manifesto is based around three principles: eating for pleasure, eating whole foods and eating the best food you can. There are climate-friendly ideas for breakfasts, lunches and dinners, plus sharing plates, sweet treats and pantry items – though each chapter opens with ‘anti-recipes’, an invitation to invent your own dishes following charts and guides. Octopus, £26

  • For The Love of Land

    For the Love of the Land, compiled by Jenny Jeffries

    Buying local is pivotal to sustainable eating, which is why Jenny Jeffries’ recipe book celebrates British farming in all its glory. The Cambridgeshire-based farmer’s wife outlines how to make the most of local and seasonal ingredients, telling the heart-warming stories of farming families across the country. From these, Jeffries has compiled over 200 recipe ideas, such as Blackbrook beef bolognese from a traditional lowland farm in Leicestershire; pheasant and asparagus crumble by game farmers Jono and Louise Santry; and a cocktail featuring edible flowers from Greens of Devon. Meze Publishing, £22