Beacon-and-armour

The Pre-Order – Your New Way To Buy Clothes

Fashion /


The new way to shop

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Not only does pre-ordering your wardrobe allow brands to cut down on waste and deadstock, it also means you’ll be the owner of something unlikely to be seen all over Instagram too – win-win.

The Pre-Order – Your New Way To Buy Clothes

Cawley Studio

Cawley

Image credit: Luke Fullalove

Using 100 per cent natural materials, zero plastic in their garments or packaging, and made in London, Hannah Cawley’s designs are both timeless and functional. Two collections a year keep things super simple. We all need this gingham dress in our wardrobes. Beautiful clothes you’ll want to keep forever. cawleystudio.com

Charlotte Simone

Charlotte Simone

Having founded her company Charlotte Simone, famed for its ‘playful designs in signature happy shades’ in 2015, last year, Charlotte Beecham took a huge leap of sustainable faith, completing flipping her business model. Now she produces limited-run curated collections available for one week only at a time, thus almost eliminating waste. charlottesimone.com

Kitri

Kitri

While maintaining a bit of visibility in shops like Selfridges, Kitri has ditched fashion weeks and now concentrates on pre-order and made to order, with monthly collections and weekly drops, all in limited runs. Check them out for colour pops and excellent prints. kitristudio.com

Beacon & Armour

Beacon-and-armour

Literally launching one item at a time, Beacon & Armour has just released its latest small-batch product – the chore jacket, made in 100 per cent British corduroy, where customers got to choose the three final colours. With only 50 available, they get snapped up fast but you can sign up here to get on the waiting list for the second batch which is in the offing. beacon-armour.com

Phoebe English

phoebe-english

Founded in 2011, sustainability has been at the heart of Phoebe’s designs since launch. All products are created in ‘made to order batches’ and are made in London, thus cutting transport costs too. And when it comes to materials, she sources as many from the UK as is possible – even asking other designers for materials they won’t be using anymore. Collaboration like this we need more of. phoebeenglish.com

DISCOVER MORE:

Sustainable Spring Dresses for 2021 / How To Clear Out Your Wardrobe Sustainably